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1 edition of Effects of timber harvest following wildfire in western North America found in the catalog.

Effects of timber harvest following wildfire in western North America

David L. Peterson

Effects of timber harvest following wildfire in western North America

by David L. Peterson

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Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station in Portland, OR .
Written in English


About the Edition

This synthesis provides an ecological foundation for management of the diverse ecosystems and fire regimes of North America, based on scientific principles of fire interactions with vegetation, fuels, and biophysical processes. Although a large amount of scientific data on fire exists, most of those data have been collected at small spatial and temporal scales. Thus, it is challenging to develop consistent science-based plans for large spatial and temporal scales where most fire management and planning occur. Understanding the regional geographic context of fire regimes is critical for developing appropriate and sustainable management strategies and policy. The degree to which human intervention has modified fire frequency, intensity, and severity varies greatly among different ecosystems, and must be considered when planning to alter fuel loads or implement restorative treatments. Detailed discussion of six ecosystems--ponderosa pine forest (western North America), chaparral (California), boreal forest (Alaska and Canada), Great Basin sagebrush (intermountain West), pine and pine-hardwood forests (Southern Appalachian Mountains), and longleaf pine (Southeastern United States)--illustrates the complexity of fire regimes and that fire management requires a clear regional focus that recognizes where conflicts might exist between fire hazard reduction and resource needs. In some systems, such as ponderosa pine, treatments are usually compatible with both fuel reduction and resource needs, whereas in others, such as chaparral, the potential exists for conflicts that need to be closely evaluated. Managing fire regimes in a changing climate and social environment requires a strong scientific basis for developing fire management and policy. --

Edition Notes

StatementDavid L. Peterson ... [et al.].
SeriesGeneral technical report PNW -- GTR-776, General technical report PNW -- 776.
ContributionsPacific Northwest Research Station (Portland, Or.)
Classifications
LC ClassificationsSD538.2.W4 E34 2009
The Physical Object
Pagination51 p. :
Number of Pages51
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24563688M
LC Control Number2009376961
OCLC/WorldCa318000462

Wildfires are a natural part of the ecosystems in the interior of British Columbia.1 However, evidence suggests that large wildfires which were previously considered exceptional may now be the new normal. The incidence of large wildfires in western North America is projected to increase as the climate.   Wildfires in the U.S. have caused more and more damage over the years. Over million acres have been burned as the result of m wildfires in alone, with just 87 active fires being linked to over million acres of damage.   .

  For example, in –, 5 million ha of forest (% of the forest area) was adversely affected by insects in the United States, and 14 million ha was affected in Canada (%); the area annually damaged by insects in North America is % of the total forest area.   Timber harvesting [i.e. “logging”] is a fundamental piece of “aggressive forest management to ensure effective fire management.” In fact, timber harvesting .

  The recreation and timber industries depend on healthy forests, and wildfire smoke has been directly linked to poor air quality and illness, even in communities far downwind. 4,5 Fire-related threats are increasing, especially as more people live in and around forests, grasslands, and other natural areas. 6 The United States spends more than $1. Peterson DL, Agee JK, Aplet GH, Dykstra DP, Graham RT, Lehmkuhl JF, Pilliod DS, Potts DF, Powers RF, Stuart JD () Effects of timber harvest following wildfire in western North America. USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, General Technical Report .


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Effects of timber harvest following wildfire in western North America by David L. Peterson Download PDF EPUB FB2

Timber harvest following wildfire leads to different outcomes depending on the biophysical setting of the forest, pattern of burn severity, operational aspects of tree removal, and other management activities. Fire effects range from relatively minor, in which fire burns through the understory and may kill a few trees, to severe, in which fire kills most trees and removes much of the organic Cited by: Effects of Timber Harvest Following Wildfire in Western North America Introduction Timber harvest following large wildfires is typically conducted to capture the economic value of wood and sometimes may achieve other resource management objectives (e.g., reduced stand densities).

This practice (often referred to as “sal-Cited by:   Timber harvest following wildfire leads to different outcomes depending on the biophysical setting of the forest, pattern of burn severity, operational aspects of tree removal, and other management activities.

Fire effects range from relatively minor, in which fire burns through the understory and may kill a few trees, to severe, in which fire kills most trees and removes much. Get this from a library. Effects of timber harvest following wildfire in western North America. [David L Peterson; Pacific Northwest Research Station (Portland, Or.);] -- This synthesis provides an ecological foundation for management of the diverse ecosystems and fire regimes of North America, based on scientific principles of fire interactions with vegetation.

Effects of timber harvest following wildfire in western North America. BibTeX @MISC{States09effectsof, author = {United States and Forest Service and David L.

Peterson and James K. Agee and Gregory H. Aplet and Dennis P. Dykstra and Russell T. Graham and John F. Lehmkuhl and David S. Pilliod and Donald F.

Potts and Robert F. Powers and John D. Stuart and The Forest and Service U. S and Department Agriculture}, title = {Effects of Timber Harvest Following Wildfire. Abstract. principle of multiple use management of the Nation’s forest resources for sustained yields of wood, water, forage, wildlife, and recreation.

following a fire. Scientists from the PNW Research Station and their colleagues from other research stations and univer-sities are synthesizing the science on the effects of postfire timber harvests following large wildfires in western North America. Their objective was to clarify the extent to which.

The Pacific Northwest had many fires last year. For some, forest fires conjure images of trees completely vaporized by fire. But crown fires often move through a forest fairly rapidly, consuming tree needles and fine branches and leaving charred snags.

Chopping into those trees often reveals sound wood. Salvage sales. Most timber is extracted by local corporations that support the government.

There is an infinite supply of timber because wood is a renewable resource. No ancient forests remain in developing nations.

Local residents use most of the timber, and the government does not want to impose restrictions on its citizens. For example, million ha of a total million ha forest area is estimated to be affected by harvest each year in North America, with an additional 1 million ha converted to other land uses (Masek et al., ).

Because of the large scale of forestry and its global reach, there has long been interest in understanding the effects of. Wildfires and timber harvest are two of the most prevalent disturbances in North American forests. To evaluate and compare their impact on small mammals, I conducted meta-analyses on (1) the.

This paper reviews and compares the effects of forest fire and timber harvest on mammalian abundance and diversity, throughout successional time in the boreal forest of North America. Temporal trends in mammal abundance and diversity are generally similar for both harvested and burned stands, with some differences occurring in the initiation.

Introduction. Wildfires are integral in shaping ecosystems across the western United States, and large wildfire years have increased markedly in recent years (StephensMiller et al. Westerling ), along with the size of stand‐replacing (syn.

high‐severity) fire patches (O’Connor et al.Stevens et al. ).Given the large extent of the landscape currently recovering. B) decreases long-term timber yield by more than 60% C) tends to provide additional food and habitat for many types of wildlife D) has no effect on the severity of wildfires E) eliminates wildfires from forests.

Timber Harvesting, Silviculture, and Watershed Processes T. Chamberlin, R. Harr, and F. Everest Waters in forested lands of western North America are major producers of anadromous salmon and trout. The size of the fishery resource is large, but it is diminishing as a result of human activities and currently is only a fraction of its.

Wildfires and insect outbreaks have caused widespread tree mortality in dry coniferous forests of western North America in recent decades, and anticipated climatic changes suggest even higher impacts in the future (e.g., Westerling et al.,Raffa et al.,Flannigan et al.,Luo et al.,Breshears et al., ).

Western United States forest wildfire activity is widely thought to have increased in recent decades, yet neither the extent of recent changes nor the degree to which climate may be driving regional changes in wildfire has been systematically documented.

Much of the public and scientific discussion of changes in western United States wildfire has focused instead on the effects of 19th. While subject to annual variation, total timber harvesting in California has declined by over two‑thirds since the late s. As shown in the figure, harvest rates have dropped from over billion board feet in—its recent peak—to about million inwhen it was at its lowest in recent history—a decline of over 80 percent.”.

Rates of Deforestation & Reforestation in the U.S. Deforestation is forest loss through urban sprawl, land clearing for agriculture, wildfire, disease or timber harvest. The United States went through a period of intense deforestation between andbut the size of its forest areas has been relatively.

Although the wildfires burned through hundreds of thousands of acres, it only destroyed about 2 percent of the pine sawtimber in the Northern Florida and Southeastern Georgia timber market, he said.

Yet it has impacted all timberland owners in the region in terms of pricing. Suz-Anne Kinney: +1 or @(a) Western North America: broad-scale patterns. The western North American fire chronology network shows a strong pattern of synchronous, large and small fire years extending back to at least CE.

Overall, the synchrony of large and small fire events is quite remarkable; the most common fire dates were recorded in more than 25% of the   There are few places in western North America, and increasingly in the northern regions of Canada and Alaska, where wildfire and its effects are unfamiliar sights.

Last year, wildfires burned more thanhectares of National Forest lands; the same year, a record million hectares burned across all land ownerships in the United States.